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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 10, 2021 10:00pm-12:00am PDT

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how hard has the last year been? >> harder. >> why? >> people are dying. >> heartbreak in the emergency rooms of michigan, as the state faces yet another covid surge. tense fighting in myanmar as the military's assault on its own people continues. more than 700 have been killed since the coup began. we'll have a live update for you. also -- >> fire! >> fire! >> international tributes for the duke of edinburgh and at home, as well. we'll show you the images from across the globe.
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and live from cnn world headquarters here in atlanta, i'm michael holmes. this is "cnn newsroom." and our top story this hour, an influential covid-19 model warns americans not to put their masks away yet, as cases surge in michigan. let's have a look at that spike there. you can see it at the right of the graph. the state reporting nearly 7,000 new cases on saturday. the federal government sending 160 extra vags nayccinators to get shots into arms. some hospitals there are delaying nonemergency procedures on a case by case basis because they're getting full. officials calling it a last resort. medical experts say pandemic
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fatigue combined with the spread of coronavirus variants are behind the surge in michigan. cnn's evan mcmorris-santoro with more. >> reporter: even if vaccination rates rise in places like new york, where i'm standing, there's still a concern that america is in the grip of this pandemic, especially in the state of michigan, where the viral numbers are rising at a dangerous and scary rate. >> the second we let our guard down, it comes roaring back. >> reporter: as covid-19 cases soar to alarming levels in michigan, a warning. >> we are on track to potentially see a surge in cases that's even greater than the one we saw in the fall. >> reporter: the state's positivity rate is up to 18% and hospitalizations are climbing. governor gretchen whitmer is asking high schools to go remote. youth sports to pause. and encouraging citizens to skip indoor dining for the next two weeks. >> to be very clear, these are not orders, mandates or
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requirements. a year in, we all know what works and this has to be a team effort. we have to do this together. >> reporter: vaccinations in the state continue, but not fast enough. the governor is pleading for more vaccines from the federal government. as a disruption of the supply of johnson & johnson vaccines continues to take a toll across the u.s. >> we really should be surging vaccines to states that are experiencing serious outbreaks. >> reporter: the coordinator of the white house coronavirus response says the federal government will suffer states with outbreaks additional testing and personnel, but as of now, will not increase the number of vaccines. >> the virus is unpredictable. we don't know where the next increase in cases could occur. we're not even halfway through our vaccination program, so now is not the time to change course on vaccine allocation. >> reporter: this, as the cdc is aware of four states that have reported some adverse reactions to the johnson & johnson vaccine.
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several states even halting distribution of that vaccine. this cdc is not recommending health departments stop administering johnson & johnson shots at this time. and at least one county in north carolina plans on resuming doses as soon as monday. >> right now, the benefits really outweigh the risks but more information will hopefully come out. >> reporter: and what could be promising news. drugmaker pfizer asking the fda for emergency use authorization of its covid-19 vaccine to expand to children ages 12 to 15 in the u.s. currently it's approved for people 16 and up only. >> i'm very optimistic about this. we need them to get the benefit of the vaccine but also it will help us to reach herd immunity a lot faster. >> reporter: and vaccine requirements are becoming part of the new normal. analysis by cnn finds 16 colleges and universities and counting, the latest duke university, will require students to show proof of full vaccination before returning to on-campus classes this fall. experts are telling americans to keep the precautions going.
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to keep wearing masks and avoiding places where people aren't wearing them. even if they're vaccinated. because this virus, they say, this pandemic, is still very much with us. evan mcmorris-santoro, cnn, new york. >> dr. abdul el sayed is a former detroit health commissioner. doctor, good to see you. the u.s. seeing bigger numbers in recent days as this uk variant becomes dominant. particularly where you are, in michigan. what are your concerns, even as vaccinations continue? >> that's right, michael. we have this unfortunate circumstance where we have a set of dynamics that are leading to spread, particularly as you mentioned here in my home state of michigan. the first is that we've got b 1.1.7 in some pretty profound ways. growth, 7.5% every week or so and that really is concerning because it's more transmissible and it's more virulent, more
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deadly. the second is, while we have vaccines on the way, they're still not yet here. 25% of americans are fully vaccinated. that leaves another 50% or so that need to get vaccinated to get to that bottom level of herd immunity that we need to really be able to clamp down on this pandemic. and then the third is that there has been a lot of, we'll just say aggressive reopening in the face of the oncoming vaccines and i think in some respects the optimism about what the vaccines can do has outstripped how much vaccine we've actually gotten into arms and so you take those things together and you're starting to see the uptick that we're seeing across the country and it's concerning, because we're on the doorstep of the finish line and we just need to get across and so folks need to hold on and do the things we have been doing, masking up, backing up, washing up and hopefully now vaxing up. >> i wanted to pick your brain, too, because when you talk about vaccination numbers, globally, the statistics are really
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worrying. only 2% of the global population has been able to get fully vaccinated. 2%. the healthiest countries are vaccinating 25% faster than poorer countries. dozens of countries haven't had a single dose. there was a duke study that suggested poorer countries might not have enough vaccine until 2024. what happens in one country impacts others, so, how important is the global vaccination effort? >> absolutely right, michael. this is a global pandemic. we have to take the global part extremely seriously. folks in this country are really worried about it, because a, we know that we have a global responsibility to making sure that the vaccines that are manufactured here, that they get out everywhere, because, of course, it is critical for us to do our part to make sure that we're bringing down this global pandemic. the second part of it, though, it really is concerning, because every single warm body that remains up vaccinated presents an opportunity for this virus to pick up more mutations,
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potentially a mutation that would render our vaccines potentially useless. a mutation that would allow this virus to slip vaccine immunity. it really is a matter of not just the right thing to do, but the right thing to do for folks living here in the united states. so, it is a real responsibility and we need to do what we can to make sure that we are getting vaccines out to everyone in this world to finally end a real global pandemic. i really appreciate you bringing that up, michael. >> yeah, it's a great point. don't vaccinate poorer countries and then you're going to end up sufferi ing in wealthier countrs eventually anyway. you touched on this, but whether you're vaccinated or not, models are showing that wearing that mask could still save thousands of lives in the months ahead. what do you say to those, even if vaccinated, who might relax on that front? >> that's right. look, we know that the dynamics of pandemics, they can move really quickly on us. and these vaccines are safe and
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very effective. but the problem is is that for these vaccines to have their full effect, we need blanket vaccinations. and the way i think about vaccines is kind of like a blanket. if you put a blanket on a fire, right, you can bring that fire down. and so, these vaccines are like a blanket for this pandemic. the problem, though, is if you slowly feed a blenanket into a fire, it means that fire will eat up that blanket. part of the affect here is, we need to get a lot of people vaccinated at the same time to achieve this idea of herd immunity to bring this pandemic down. until then, it's critical that even vaccinated people do their part to prevent the spread of these diseases. and that means wearing a mask. i know that a lot of people find it uncomfortable, but let's be honest, right, it's a lot less uncomfortable than living in a world where there's a global pandemic ongoing because we haven't done our part to stop it. >> i'm going to find it weird to not wear a mask and i don't i'll ever touch a doorknob again in
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my life. dr. abdul el sayed, thank you. >> michael, thank you. ♪ now, in the united kingdom, there has been a second day of tributes to prince philip. images of the duke of edinburgh lighting up london's famous piccadilly circus. elsewhere, there were gun salutes in his honor. >> fire! >> fire! >> fire! >> you can see cardiff castle there. rounds were also fired at the tower of london, edinburgh castle and at sea. prince charles says his father would have been touched by the reaction to his death. >> my dear papa was a very special person who, i think above all else, would have been amazed by the reaction and the
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touching things that have been said about him. from that point of view, we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that. it will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. >> now, we're learning more about the duke's funeral, which will take place on saturday, april 17, a low key ceremony in line with the duke's wishes. and covid guidelines, of course, which allow up to 30 people to attend. prince harry is going to fly in from california, though meghan, who is pregnant with their second child, is being advised by her doctor not to travel. cnn's issa juarez is in windsor for us. the pandemic impacting the funeral plans, but the duke wanted a low key affair? >> yes, good morning, michael. he wanted a low fuss funeral. that's just the sort of man he was. he didn't want attention to be on him and so i think what we
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are seeing is in many ways ironic that this low key funeral may have been, in fact, michael, to the duke of edinburgh's taste. it won't be, like you said, a royal -- it won't be -- it will be a ceremonial royal funeral and not a full state funeral. there won't be processions, there won't be crowds because of covid-19. it will be a small, intimate funeral, perhaps to his liking. only 30 people will be able to attend. they will have to wear a mask and keep social distancing. but what we have heard from -- from officials is that, in fact, it will still meet the duke's wishes and it will actually be able to reflect, his life, his legacy and his work. in terms of who will attend. we know that boris johnson, the prime minister, will not be able attend. he won't be attending. we know, as you mentioned,
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prince harry will be coming from the united states. we assume he'll probably have to arrive sometime today, because remember, michael, he will have to quarantine for some time. we know that his wife will not be able to attend because she is pregnant and been advised by her doctor not to travel. in regards to the eulogies and other members of the royal family who may attend, we'll find out more on thursday but it will be a small and intimate funeral but of course, members of the public will be able to watch it on television, although, as we heard from prince charles, they are deeply saddened that the public cannot partake in his father's funeral. michael? >> all right, isa suarez there in windsor, england, thank you so much. prince philip was deeply passionate about sport and tributes haven be taking place at venues across britain. a moment of silence before rug
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by union games and premier league matches over the weekend the grand national horse race also played tribute to the duke who himself had been a world champion equestrian. nature and the outdoors were also among prince philip's great loves. something he got to indulge in on royal visits to africa. we have more on the duke's legacy there. >> reporter: it was on a trip to kenya that the lives of then princess elizabeth and her husband philip would be forever changed. >> they went up the tree as a couple and one came down as a queen, who was a princess. and that was then the current queen of england. >> reporter: in 1952, while staying at tree tops hotel, elizabeth became queen, after her father, king george, died in his sleep after a bout with lung cancer back in england. philip was the one that broke
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the news to her, which would alter his bath, as well. he gave up his career in the navy and embarked on a life as the queen's consort. in this role, he would become a familiar face to the commonwealth countries of africa, which were once under british rule. he met some of the continent's most famous leaders, sometimes accompanied by the queen. other times, representing the crown on trips on his own. >> prince philip, queen elizabeth, husband has died age 99. >> tributes have continue to pour after the duke of edinburgh, princ prince philip died. >> the duke was once president of the world wildlife fund. though he loved to hunt and fish. the president of cameroon tweeted that he will continue to inspire generations who have been marked by his fight for the protection of the environment. but for some, his impact across
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africa can't be separated from the dark history of british colonial rule. >> basically, to me, as a ugandan, i don't think it would mean that much to me, but to the monarchy, it's a big step, considering he was a consort to the queen. there is a gap for her. >> i think it's just held up by years and years of -- the legacy of colonialism, that's what holds it up. >> many commonwealth leaders tweeted their condolences to the royal family and especially to the queen, saying the man who brought her those difficult tidings decades ago won't soon be forgotten. >> it is sad, yes, because we've lost a life but then looking at the age he was, i guess it's a celebratory thing. celebrating the prince's life. and coming up here on "cnn newsroom," medical experts and law enforcement officers take the stand in the murder trial of
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former officer derek chauvin. what they had to say about the cause of floyd's death. that's when we come back. [sfx: psst psst] allergies don't have to be scary. spraying flonase daily stops your body from overreacting to allergens all season long. psst! psst! all good at panera, we take care of dinnertime. we use fresh, clean ingredients to make mouthwatering masterpieces. order our new flatbread pizzas for dinner tonight with delivery or pick-up. only at panera. ♪ (car audio) you have reached your destination.
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well, it was another week full of gripping testimony in the murder trial of derek chauvin, the former minneapolis police officer accused in last year's killing of george floyd, the unarmed black man. the focus this week, the medical analysis of floyd's cause of death. cnn's adrienne broaddus brings us tsome of this week's most powerful moments. >> reporter: the week concluded with andrew baker, the hennepin county medical examiner. >> you conducted the autopsy on mr. george floyd. >> i did. >> reporter: acknowledged that heart disease and drugs played a role in george floyd's death, but the manner of death remains a homicide. >> it's what i put on the death certificate last june. law enforcement subdual restraint and neck compression. >> reporter: baker's statements capped off a week of testimony from medical experts and law enforcement officials, repeatedly poking holes in floyd died from a combination
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of underlying health conditions along with the ingestion of meth amphetamine and fentanyl. >> that's the moment the life goes out of his body. >> reporter: dr. martin tobin, a world renowned pulmonologist broke down in detail through video and pictures, four critical factors that he says caused floyd to stop breathing, like floyd's position on the says fault, which restricted his lungs. >> you mentioned several reasons for mr. floyd's low oxygen. you mentioned one, handcuffs and the street, right? >> correct. >> you mentioned knee on the neck? >> yeah. >> prone position. >> yeah. >> and then the knee on the back, arm and side. were those the four? >> yeah, these are the four. >> reporter: defense attorney eric nelson argued that floyd could have died as a result of taking drugs moments prior to officers forcing him to the ground. >> is it fair to say that you would expect the peak fentanyl
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respiratory depression within about five minutes? >> i mean, obviously it would depend on how much of it was ingested, but if there was any amount of it ingested, yes, the peak would be five minutes. >> reporter: tobin ultimately concluded drugs didn't kill floyd, testifying that he had not taken a proper breath for almost ten minutes, at which point, the carbon dioxide in floyd's body had reached lethal levels. the jury also heard from chauvin's former boss, minneapolis police chief medaria he later said what happened to floyd was, quote, murder. the chief was used about chauvin's use of force. >> so, is it your belief then that this particular form of restraint, if that's what you -- if that's what we'll call it, in fact violates departmental policy?
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>> i absolutely agree. >> reporter: the defense pushed back, arguing that chauvin's knee placement, which they say was actually on floyd's back, was a proper police prone hold. >> does this appear to be a neck restraint? >> no, sir. >> does this appear to be a prone hold that an officer may apply with his knee? >> yes. >> reporter: but the testimonial theme from law enforcement and use of force experts was clear, witnesses clearly told the jury that derek chauvin used, quote, excessive and deadly force on george floyd when restraining him with his knee for more than nine minutes. >> and our thanks to adrienne broaddus for that. now, defense lawyers will soon call their own witnesses and of course cnn will have complete coverage when court resumes monday, that's right here on cnn. quick break. the covid-19 situation so bad in michigan, hospitals are starting to become worried. >> the first day i came in and
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saw that our unit was full of covid patients again, it was really difficult. i had tears in my eyes. >> we'll take you inside a hospital fighting the surge. hospital fighting the surge. stay with us. is the world's longest-lasting, we tested it against our competitor's best battery. (meowing) (clicking) and energizer ultimate lithium wins again! energizer, backed by science. matched by no one.
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it's moving day. and while her friends are doing the heavy lifting, don't let acne leave its mark. jess is busy moving her xfinity internet and tv services. it only takes about a minute.
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wait, a minute? but what have you been doing for the last two hours? ...delegating? oh, good one. move your xfinity services without breaking a sweat. xfinity makes moving easy. go online to transfer your services in about a minute. get started today. and welcome back to our viewers all around the world. i'm michael holmes. at the top of the hour, we mentioned the covid-19 surge in michigan. well, cnn got access to the one of the hospitals once again filling up. it had to reform its covid unit after disbanding it months ago, as cnn's miguel marquez reports.
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how are you? fred was on his way to get vaccinated. >> i was going there and i didn't feel right. >> reporter: he got a covid-19 test instead. it was positive. you were right at the finish line. >> there was a lot of -- there was a lot of emotional baggage that went with that. >> reporter: he says he got it from his 19-year-old son, andy, his wife betsy was fully vaccinated with the moderna vaccine. she, too, got covid-19, with only minor symptoms. the virus hammered fred, 54 years year s old and no underlying conditions. >> i felt like i went ten rounds with mike tyson. i was absolutely physically exhausted. i mean, i felt like i had been beat up, i felt like i had been in a car accident. i mean, it was crazy.
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>> reporter: tina thinks her son's soccer club brought the coronavirus into her home. >> we're all masked up on the sidelines, everyone's yelling. >> reporter: her boys got it with no symptoms. her husband jason got a bad case. hers was worse. >> they said, yeah, you have few moan ya caused from covid, so, going to admit you and here i am. >> reporter: how surprised you are to be in this bed? >> oh, very shocked. >> reporter: the 44 mother of two with no underlying conditions, outdoorsy, active, never sick, adhered to coronavirus guidelines. never thought she would get covid or that it would hit her this hard. >> it's weird. it's almost like you feel like you're suffocating a little bit. i don't know, it's hard to explain, because you get really light-headed and you're just like, oh. clammy. >> reporter: two cases of thousands in the wolverine state
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in its third coronavirus surge. >> i would say that the rate of increase seems more drastic than it did back then. >> reporter: at lansing's sparrow health system, covid-19 admissions have risen 600% in a month. >> we're trying to see where we can pull extra staff from. >> reporter: the hospital had disbanded its covid incident command center w. with cases piling up, they've re-established it. >> reporter: in september, we had close to 150 patients. right now, we have 95. the rate it's going, we'll be at 150 patients in 15 days. >> reporter: 15 days? >> yes. >> reporter: do you know where the top of the curve is? >> we do not. >> reporter: dr. justin specializes in caring for patients with covid at beaumont health royal oak, part of the largest health care system in michigan. covid tests of some patients sent for dna analysis indicate a worrying sign. a sharp increase in the new,
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more conte contagious b.1.1.7 variant. >> we're seeing something like 40% of our patients now with it. >> reporter: oh, right? >> yeah, so big percent. >> reporter: as older michiganders get vaccinated, hospitalizations for them have plummeted. >> each surge has brought different challenges and when we address them, we felt very strong that we had this disease under attack but then we get thrown a curveball. >> reporter: for health care workers, an exhausting year getting longer. >> the first day i came in and saw that our unit was full of covid patients again, it was really difficult. i had tears in my eyes. >> reporter: 22 years, a registered nurse. >> yes. >> reporter: how hard has the last year been? >> harder. >> reporter: why? >> because people are dying.
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i'm sorry. >> reporter: why is this so hard to talk about? >> because i just saw yest yesterday -- >> reporter: what did you see? >> i had a patient who passed away. >> reporter: the weight of so much sickness and death. that burden getting only heavier. miguel marquez, cnn, michigan. >> now, one of the most heartbreaking things about the coronavirus pandemic, of course, is the people suffering and dying alone in hospitals without their loved ones nearby. want to show you something that a brazilian nurse came up with to offer comfort and also to help measure patient's oxygen levels. she filled two medical gloves with warm water and shaped them as hands. it mimics human touch. and it also at the same time warms patients hands. a journalist who tweeted the picture called it the hand of god.
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we've seen more violence in myanmar. the military continuing to slaughter its own citizens at a brutal rate. more than 80 people were killed on friday alone. this latest bloodshed happening in the city of bagur. the monitoring group saying security forces used assault rifles, hand grenades and even rocket-propelled grenades on people's homes. now that brings the civilian death toll since the coup to more than 700. paula hancocks following all of this for us from neighboring thailand. i mean, that death toll just keeps going up, but the protesters continue to turn out. >> reporter: yeah, michael, the monitoring group you're talking about, aapp, they point out every time that the actual death
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toll will likely be far higher. these are just the people who have lost their lives that they can confirm. obviously a very difficult situation to do on the ground. now, this is a city that's about 60 kilometers away from the capital and according to local media and those on the ground, they say that on friday the shooting started early in the morning and it went on all day. now, as you mentioned there, there is some very heavy machinery being used. rpgs, rocket-propelled grenades, against protesters. this is the sort of weaponry you would expect to see on the battlefield. that was pointed out by aapp. the military wanted a battlefield, and what it was was a killing field. we have a very different narrative coming from the military junta. they say they came under attack from 30, 50, 80 protesters, saying they were using hand made guns, fire bottles, arrows, hand
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made shields and they claim that just one person was killed on the protess ter side. two very different versions coming in here. eyewitnesses saying they saw many, many bodies being loaded onto military trucks and then taken away. this is something that we have heard in the past from different areas, the fact that the military is taking bodies away to potentially try and hide that death toll. now, at the same time, we also heard on friday that some 19 people have been sentenced to death by the military junta for what they allege was being involved in the death of an associate of an army captain. again, with e see on the military side,impunity, there's repercussions for the deaths that they cause, but when it comes to the protester side, we hear from the military's state-run media that there are now 19 sentenced to death for that one individual death.
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we don't know the exact details of that case itself. michael? >> just an unbelievable situation. paula hancocks there in thailand for us. thank you. now, saturday marked the 23rd anniversary of the landmark good friday peace agreement in northern ireland, but it came with violence on the rise again and warnings against sliding back into sectarian conflict. some protests by pro british loyalists were postponed after the death of prince philip. they're angry about brexit, but angry about other things, as well. all right, let's go back 23 years now to remember what was. the good friday agreement ended decades of deadly conflict known as the troubles that pitted loyalists against pro-irish nationalists. fast forward back to this week and riots that began in loyalist areas spilled across to so-called peace line boundaries in belfast along the nationalist
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side. let's get some perspective on all of this. i want to bring in writer and commentator sarah crichton, live from belfast. thank you for being with us. so, first of all, how much of what we are seeing is about brexit and the northern ireland p protocol, and how much that is a spark to other grievances? >> yes, michael. there's a number of different reasons why. there's multiple factors. brexit is one of them. so, there is anger there in the northern protocol, which came part due to the british brexit deal. they believe that it has effected the british identity and they are very angry about that, but i do think it is important to point out that loyalists do not support
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vio violence. that is very much the sense there among those communities at this point in time. >> sectarian violence, nor the paramilitary groups behind it, never fully disappeared from northern ireland, i mean, do you -- do you see their hand, bad faith actors, if you like, exploiting some of what we're seeing? >> that's certainly what journalists on the ground are reporting, that there is an element of this, which can be attributed to paramilitary, in certain parts of northern ireland, there were people who were instigating this. that some of the violence has been organizeized in other places, as well. there is certainly a criminal element here and i do think the concern is that a lot of children are going out and rioting here and they are maybe being egged on by older paramilitaries, and that is a huge worry. >> in fact, i was just about to ask you about that, because it is striking the number of young
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people involved and we're talking early teens. youths who wouldn't have known the troubles because they wouldn't have been born and these allegations that they're being egged on by older people. you know, clearly the hatred of old, the deep historical divisions, still exist on some level. do you see a time when that won't be so? >> i don't know if that will ever happen in my lifetime but i think it's important to say, this is based on hundreds of years, decades of conflicts. obviously there's a lot of pain on both sides, so, that is going to take a long time to disappear, but i do think it is an indictment of our politicians in northern ireland that we haven't moved along as much as we should have done after 23 years. nobody expected all of this would be sorted in 23 years, but i think there's a lot of work to be done and certainly in terms of tackling sectarian division, there's a lot of work to do and leadership is needed by politicians in northern ireland and a lot of the concern is that politicians in northern ireland maybe haven't provided that leadership.
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at this time, it is alive, this situation, to escalate in a way it should not have, but there are multiple reasons for this, but certainly that underlying issue of the conflict itself is a problem and it's going to have to be tackled down the road or this could -- it could escalate, but we're not talking about the troubles coming back again. it's important to stress that. but there is a concern if this is not dealt properly, it will not add to the situation. >> yeah, it is sad in many ways. i was in belfast covering the troubles in '88-89 and here we are. it's been two weeks of this, 88 police officers reportedly hurt. where do you see this heading or where do you fear it could head? >> i think if you had spoken to me a couple of weeks ago, i wouldn't have been as worried as i am now. i do have to stress, when i sam i'm worried, i'm not worried that the troubles are going to come back, but the situation is quite delicate but there are people out there and i cannot stress enough they are the
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minority that are maybe intent on causing trouble and causing violence and i think the concern, the worry is, where is that going to be directed? is it going to be directed towards the british government? i don't know. i don't think so. there is a lot of anger towards the irish government, who are being blamed by some of these elements for the northern protocol. that's a concern. and the issues with a threat and had the security. obviously this could spill over into communal violence, as well. it's hard to say where this is going. there's a lot of talking at this point in time. just in general, between the groups trying to talk to different political parties. hopefully this will calm down. hopefully this will just disappear as it has done in the past and this will be dealt with properly, but the concern is this could just escalate that this violence becomes much more prominent over the summer, when the 12th of july parades and things kick off and that could get even more frequent.
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>> yeah, that is the fear, i mean, 23 years since that good friday agreement. is the broad er peace, i mean, you've got the leadership on both sides wanting to calm things down. is there any suggestion that the broader peace in terms of the agreement is at risk in any way? >> not at this point, no. certainly there is a feeling and a sentiment amongst some loyalist communities who are a bit frustrated with the good friday agreement and that has come up because in terms of what we call the peace dividend, in terms of the benefit, it really has not gone to working class communities. in northern ireland, that's republican armed loyalists. but i don't think the peace agreement is going to fail. it's codified in law and legislation. there's still widespread support so i don't think we're there yet. i think that isn't likely to
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happen. hopefully. >> yeah. yeah, thankfully. sarah, fascinating. great to talk to you and get your analysis there in belfast, thank you. >> thank you very much. quick break here on the program. when we come back, it has already devastated parts of indonesia, now it's on its way to australia. we track the progression of a tropical cyclone. we'll be right back. the first time the other day. the scent made quite an impression. ♪ i swear ♪ it was like that towel and jaycee were the only two left on earth. but... they weren't. you can always spot a first timer. gain flings with oxi boost and febreze. try the new light scent from gain. hello spring daydream.
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look at what! look at that! >> look at that, indeed. that's a waterspout just offshore of pap ma city beach, florida, on saturday and then coming onshore. well, when it does that it's a tornado, right? it caused extensive damage and knocked out power to hundreds of homes and businesses. amazing. now western australia is preparing for the arrival of a pretty rare and powerful storm that has already caused major damage in indonesia. derek van dam non forring the
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situation. what's going on, derek? >> that is cyclone activity over western straim. you can see the broader perspective. we're monitoring three different areas but focussing in on s sarraja. it is now a singular tropical cyclone that is making its presence known along the klein of western australia. landfall with the next three to four hours, just to the north of geraldton. 120 kilometer per hour sustained winds. for the united states audience that's we have leapt to a low category 1. i think the coastal erosion issue will be of concern. this storm is pushing up a lot of water from the ocean and with
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that comes large waves and the potential for some destruction there. you can see 1 o 10 kilometer per hour. this is a quick moving storm, so that will limit the flash flooding, but nonetheless, still 50 to a hundred millimeters of rain could cause some localized flooding. this is the wave height, you can see. six to nine meter swells on the open ocean as it makes its way into this particularly roegion y local time. radar already picking up on some of the outer rain bands. look how quickley this system moves. east to southeast 40 kilometer per hour, so this thing will enter the kwags in the flooeks to four hours and it will be out for monday morning. >> all right. good day. good to see you. >> thank you.
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>> now the final round of the masters tournament starts on sunday. things were heating up on saturday. round three. until rain and wind put a bit of a damper on things. i should say it slowed the ball down, too. there's a new leader on the board. >> hideki matsuyama was moving at the masters in round three. he catapulted to the top of the leaderboard taking a four stroke lead. matsuyama has five victories in his career but he's seeking the ever-elusive first major. he'd become the first japanese to ever win a major if he wins the master. winless since 2017, he said the last few years have been a struggle. he works with a swing coach from japan. i asked him what's some of his fondest memories from his childhood. here's what he said.
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[ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: i have a lot of great memories watching the masters as a young boy, first time i watched tiger woods was the winner. another great memory is when he chipped in at 16 down the hill, putt was going on. i was dreaming some day i could play here. >> dye to covid restrikes there aren't huge media follow his every move. he said that has allowed him to relax more. he's enjoying this week more. he feels less pressure. it was after a rain delay that he took the lead. what did he do during the delay? he sat on his car on his phone and played a lot of games. he's not playing games on the course. he means business. cnn, augusta, georgia. >> raises the bar still higher! >> and history making finish there, rachel blackmoore just
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became the first female jamaica to win the grand national. blackmoore steered manilla times, her horse across the finish line on saturday. >> i just cannot believe it. he was an absolutely sensational spin. my god, i don't know what's better. i'm so lucky, i just can't believe we won the grand national. i don't feel male or female. i don't even feel human. this is just unbelievable. >> yeah. because of covid-19 restrictions, the race took place in front of empty stands but the excite zbrmt could be felt in the air. black moore became the first leadi ing jockey at the festiva. congrats to her. i'm michael holmes, thanks for your company.
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hi. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. live from cnn's world headquarters in atlanta, i'm rob ion curnow. coming up -- >> fire. international tributes for the duke of bed inboro.
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we're closely monitoring the situation in michigan. some doctors are canceling elek active surgery. plus -- >> that is florida's biggest dirty secret. you bring it up with the elected officials, they never acknowledge it. >> it's the water crisis that no one is talking about. our team at cnn climate look at what they found and it's staggering. thanks for joining me. we begin in the kurvegs where there are ongoing tributes to prince philip this weekend. images of the duke lit up the piccadilly circus as well as the bt tower. there were gun absosalutes in h
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honor. you can see the castle there. rounds were fired at the tower of london, edinborough castle and from ships at sea. prince charles said his father would be touched by the reaction to his death. >> my dear papa was a very special person who i think above all else, would have been amazed by the reaction, the touching things that have been said about him, and from that point of view, we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that. it will sustain us in this particularly loss and at this particularly sad time. >> we're learning more about the duke's funeral. it will take place on saturday, april 17th. it will be a low key ceremony in line with the duke's wishes and in keeping with covid guidelines which allow up to 30 people to attend. we know that prince harry will fly over from california but
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meghan who's pregnant with their second child has been advised not to travel. we're in windsor for more. hi, did to see you. what is it like there? >> very good morning to you. the mood is a somber one. we've seen more people the last two days coming here to windsor castle to pay their respect. people are not hovering, not staying too long. the public's been requested not to come here, lay flowers. instead, to donate whatever they could to his royal highnesses charities. but still people feel they need to come here and show their respects to as man who obviously dedicated his life to queen as well as country. it turns now to sell operating his life and reflecting his life with his funeral, which will be a ceremonial royal funeral. it's a low-key funeral, and i think that's it.
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he was the sort of man, he didn't want much fuss over himself. didn't want attention on him. it would be understated ceremony that would reflect his legacy and work as the duke of edinboro. it will be pepared down. they'll likely have to wear facemasks and practice social distancing. we know prince harry will come. he most likely will like to leave sometime today because of course he has to stay in quarantine for some time. and then we know that also prime minister boris johnson will not be attending in terms of other members of the family and the you'll joyce which we'll find out on thursday. there is a nice touch, though, to some of the elements of the funeral taking place on the 17th of april and that is that his
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coffin will be covered. we moved -- removed by a car that he designed, that he had an input in, and i think that's -- that's a small element of that, i think, will be incredibly touching as we see the procession that will be taking place behind me here in the castle. >> thanks for the update. so there have been tributes not just in bring but around the world. after cap nations, having specific romance between africa and the duke. >> the lives of princess elizabeth and her husband phillip would be forever changed. >> they went up the tree as a couple and one came down as a queen. that's the current queen.
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>> while staying at tree tops hotel, elizabeth became queen afternoon her father king george died in his sleep after a bout with lung cancer back in england. phi he gave up his career in the navy and became the queen's con sort. he would become a familiar face to the commonwealth countries of africa, which were once under british rule. he met some of the continent's most famous leaders, sometimes represented by the queen, but trips on his own. >> quthe duke edboro, prince friendship died. >> the duke was once president of the world wild life fund,
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though he loved to hunt and fish. the president of cal ran tweeted that he will con to inspire generations who have been marked by his fight for the protection of the environment. but for some, his impact across africa can't be separated from the dark history of british colonial rule. >> to me, i don't think it would mean that much to me, but to the monarchy, it's a big step. he was a con sort to the queen, so meaning there is a job for her. >> i think it's just held up by years and years of -- the legacy of cloep allism. that's what holds it up. that's the only reason we carant that news. >> many leaders tweeted their condolences and especially to the queen, saying the man who brought her the difficult tidings decades ailing won't soon be forgotten. >> we've lost a life, but then looking at the age he was, i
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guess it's a celebratory thing. celebrate the prince's life. >> cnn, johannesburg. influential covid model warns americans not to put away their masks just yet, as cases surge in michigan. i want you to look at that spike. here it is here. the state reported nearly 7,000 new cases on saturday. the federal govl is sending 160 extra vaccinators to england to help. some hospitals are dlaeing nonemergency procedures on a case-by-case basis. officials are calling it a last resort. medical experts say covid fatigue combined with the spread of it is behind the surge. here's more. >> a rise in places like new
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york where i'm standing, there's still a concern that america is in the grip of the pandemic, especially in the state of michigan where the viral numbers are rising at a dangerous and scary rate. >> the second we let our guard down, it comes roaring back. >> as cases soar, a warning. >> we're on track to potentially see a surge in cases that are even greater than the one we saw in the fall. >> the state's positivity rate is up to 18% and hospitalizations are climbing. governor gretchen bit her is asking high schools to go remote, youth sports to pause, and encouraging citizens to skip indoor dining for the next two weeks. >> these are not orders, requirements, or mandates. we know what works. this has to be a team effort. we have to do this together. >> vaccinations continue but not fast enough. the governor is pleading for more vaccines from the federal
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government. a >> we really should be surging vaccines to states that are experiencing years outbreaks. >> the coordinator of the response said the forsberg will offer states with outbreaks additional testing and personnel but will not increase the number of vaccines. >> the virus is unpredictable. we don't know where the next increase in cases could occur. we're not even halfway through our vaccination program, so now is not the time to change course on vaccine allocation. >> this at the cdc is aware of four states that have reported some adverse reaction to the johnson & johnson vaccine, some states even halting distribution of that vaccine. the cdc are not recommending they stop distribution at this time. one county in carolina plans on resume doses as early as
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mondays. >> more information hopefully will come out to the general public. >> drug maker pfizer asking the fda for emergency use thousands to expand to children ages 12 to 15 in the summeu.s. >> we need them to get the benefit of the vaccine but also it will help us to reach herd immunity faster. >> and vaccine requirements are becoming a part of the new normal. 16 colleges and universities and counting the latest, duke university, will require students to show full proof of vaccination before returning to classes on campus this fall. experts are telling americans to keep the precautions going, to keep wearing masks and avoid places people aren't wearing them, even if they're vaccinated, because they say this virus, this pandemic, is still very much with us. cnn, new york.
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>> dr. robert is the chair of the department of medicine at the university of california san francisco. doctor, thank you very much for joining us. good to see you. >> ok. >> pfizer is applying for permission. how soon do you think it will be that u.s. children over the age of 12 wait to be vaccinated? >> looks like it's safe and effective. they're using the same dose as an adult. it was a matter of trying it in the kids, which they didn't do in the original trial. it takes a few weeks to go through the process, but i imagine within a month. >> that's pretty significant, not just for parents but also for schools. >> yeah. it's a big deal. it's significant for schools. i think it will make parents feel safer. all the -- we hear about the kids are so safe and the kids don't spread the virus, that's mostly kids under 12, kids 12 to 15, 12 to 16, actually do spread
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the virus pretty much like adults, so making sure the kids are safe not only for themselves but less capable of catching the virus and spreading it to others i think is going to make everybody feel a lot better. >> this has been an extraordinary few weeks. reporting on the dire state of the u.s. death rate, now we're seeing this extraordinary rollout of vaccines. it's almost mind boggling. how much credit does the bjs take? >> a lot. i have to say the operation warp speed worked very well. they got the vaccine produced but the roilt was going quite poorly and when the biden administration took over it really picked up speed and it now -- it's humming on all cylinders, three million doses or so a day, probably the second in the world after england,
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after the uk in terms of large countries getting the vaccine out. it's quite impressive now. >> it certainly is. and what are the risks involved in what dr. fauci has called this high plateau? what does that mean and how is the jack vaccine uptake and vaccine hesitancy canceling things out? >> yeah. it's not so much vaccine hesitancy, because there are still more people who want them than don't want them. we're beginning to see that point where there's more vaccine available than people that want to take it. in the rest of the country, the demand is still very high. the plateau isn't for hesitancy. it is from the downward pressure from vaccination. a lot of people are vaccinated and they are not getting covid and they're not getting sick, but on the other hand, for the unvaccinated, it moeb the most dangerous time of all, because
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the variants are here. they're nsaier rs they're more infectious, they're more serious and people are beginning to let their guard down. if you are unvaccinated and you hear things are doing better, unfortunately states are letting things open a little too fast and people are hearing the message that it's safe. if you're unvaccinated, it's not any safer than it was for the last year, and if anything, a little bit less safe because of the variants. this is vaccinated people doing very well, unvaccinated people doing less well, so it looks flat. >> the uk is more dominant, right? >> the uk is the predominant type of sarz we have in the united states. it is 60% more infectious, 60% more serious. the vaccines work perfectly well on the uk variant. if you were vaccinated you're in
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good shape. we're seeing cases plummet. the problem is michigan, to some extent new york and new jersey, we're seeing rising case rates in the unvaccinated. those two things cancel each other out. the hope is as more people get vaccinated, the downward pressure will continue. but for now it's really two different populations and the unvaccinated, i really hope they get vaccinated because life is better if you're vaccinated. you're not going to get sick, you're not going to get covid and it is the right thing to do. >> you mentioned michigan. is that a real concern for you? >> it's a real concern if you're in michigan. it doesn't seem to be spreading that much. i'm in california where the cases are plummeting. it's remarkable how little covid we have here where i am in san francisco. but michigan is skyrocketing. a high number of cases, a fair
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number of people coming into the hospitals, and it looks like the surge that they saw in the wirmt. we know that is possible. there are not enough people who are vaccinated to prevent a possible surge particularly given the variants. in michigan they have a lot of the b.1.1.7, the so-called uk variant. if too many people are unvaccinated or we let our guard down. it's still a little bit of a cop test between florida and michigan. >> thank you for joining us and sharing your expertise with us. thank you. >> my pleasure. >> coming up, hope for those with severe cases of covid. doctors in japan say they have successfully transformed -- performed a transplant, the first of its kind to help a patient with extensive lung damage. that story next. so... you can pull photos straight from video. impressive. but will it last a whole trip? you'll have battery all day.
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while creating a cleaner future for all. at chevron, we're lowering the carbon emissions intensity of our operations, investing in lower-carbon technologies, and exploring renewable fuels of the future. we work hard to care for the homes we love. but it's only human... to protect the one we share. welcome back. germany is fighting a new covid surge with nearly 18,000 cases reported of the last 24 hours. johns hopkins university says the country has recorded more than three million cases since the pandemic began and hospitals are showing the strain. the doctor in charge of the
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intensive care association says icu beds are at a peak capacity now. he's calling for tougher measures to keep the virus from spreading. meanwhile paris police broke up a kran des tien party. it happened in the eastern part of the city on friday night. that's even though there is a 7:00 p.m. curfew and other restrictions in place to get covid under control. let's go to jim bitterman. he's outside paris. tell us more about this incident. >> well, that incidents in particularly has become something of an example of what's happening in a lot of different areas of the country. there have been other incidents as well of police moving in and breaking up these gatherings after curfew and a lot of times they're circulating around restaurants and things like that. there's supposed to be stepped-up patrols today looking for people violating the curfew or maybe violating the travel
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restrictions. this is the beginning of school. frapgs, people moving armed from one region to another and they're not supposed to be doing that. the major kind of restrictions don't seem to be having any feck. the case loads keep going up. the icu beds are full. more than 100% of the beds are covid. what that means is they have had to create more icu beds in order to accommodate the overflow. so all of it is not looking very good. the government paying much more attention to accelerating the vaccination campaign. about one in every six french people have been vaccinated. now they're going to try to step it even more. they've offered people who were over 55 years old even if they don't have underlying health conditions. they're also delaying the second shot. they're delaying the second shot by two weeks, from four to six weeks in order to get more
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vaccine, more of the first shots out there. and there's a publicity campaign that's going on and we saw some of that on -- on instagram account. you had a look at kind of jazzy approach they're taking. ♪ you see, rob ion, that the vaccination is the next step. they're hoping to get the numbers down. so far not much has had much of an impact. >> jazzy, indeed. jim bitterman, nice to see you. thanks so much. now, japanese doctors say they have successfully performed the first ever lung transplant from a living donor to a covid patient. this is a game changer. take a look. >> for patients with severe
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cases of covid-19, the simple act of breathe is a battle, a losing battle for hospital patient identified only as a woman from ckansai. she was left line support after the virus was gone. her only hope -- a lung-tissue transplant. it has worked in the u.s., china and europe, all using donors who were brain dead. the donors are so rare, in japan most will die waiting. kyoto university doctors wondered, why not use living donors, a more realistic option in japan. >> until now, lung transplants from living donors was not an option. >> they did not have to look father. the husband donated part of his left lung, her son part of his rights ling.
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a team of 30 took nearly 11 hours, successfully completing what doctors call the world's first transplant of lung tissue from living donors to a covid patient, doctors say -- >> translator: we think it is a hopeful treatment measure for patients in the sense that they have this new option. >> in about two months doctors expect their patient to be able to leave the hospital. soon after that, back to normal life. husband and son by her side. each breath almost stolen by covid-19, a second chance at life. will ripley, cnn, hong kong. >> and coming up on cnn, some u.s. marines are refusing to get vaccinated. the reasons why after the break. with the grill that grills for you. got it? got it.
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. you're watching cnn. it's 29 minutes past the hour. now, some u.s. marines are declining the coronavirus vaccine according to documents provided to cnn by the marine corps, nearly 40% of them are refusing it. officials range from the concerns about which vaccines were developed to fears over long-term effects. that is of the office week almost 76,000, little more than 60% have gotten it. cnn military analyst cedric layton joins me.
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lovely to see you. 40% of u.s. marines have refused to take the vaccine, we understand. some think that number is across the force, too. why is there this hesitancy within the u.s. military? >> robyn, i think the main reason for it is there is no correct order you will take this vaccine. that's one thing. then the other part of it, i think, is there's a lot of misinformation out there that the military rank and file are also susceptible to, and that becomes a real problem, because there is information from regular authorities from health authorities, but there's also misinformation out there that talks about some of the dangers of the -- pro ported danger of the vaccine and that's a real problem many this case because the benefits far outweigh any possible dangers to most of the vaccines that are out there. >> do you think soermgs should have a choice here or should it
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be mandatory? >> i belief it should be mandatory and here's why. i understand because we operate under an emergency use operation for the vaccines, there is a mechanism right now where soldiers, sail orgs, airmen and marines can actually refuse to take the vaccine, because it's not a -- a fully approved vaccine under the federal regulations. however, in this particularly case, because there's a readiness issue involved for the military, i think it becomes really essential that the president of the united states and the secretary of defense mandate the use of the approved vaccine such as the pfizer vaccine and the moderna vaccine in order to actually make sure that the vaccines get out there to the troops and that they are fully vaccinated in case there is a need for a deployment or for some other national emergency for them to actually participate in. >> so what do you mean there is
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a readiness issue? does this impact military preparedness? the fact that 40% of marines, for example, perhaps more across the force, are saying we don't want this, this covid vaccine? >> 40% or more are going to be vulnerable to the virus, then. even if they've had the virus, they are still susceptiblity to catching it again. the problem is if they do catch it, they're completely out of commission during that period, or there's a high likelihood that they would be. the military population is generally younger and healthier than most of the at-risk populations for covid-19, but if they're not fully vaccinated, the risk is high, especially because of the variants out there, that there might actually be a much more serious impact on their permanent health, so that's why it's a readiness issue. if you're not fully vaccinated,
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the risk is so high that you could actually become nondeployable as a result of contracting the covid-19 virus and that would be a disaster from a military standpoint. >> and this issue of hesitancy. it's a concern across the u.s., across the globe, of course, but we've seen statistically there's a high level of hesitancy among republicans, evangelicals, is this statistic about the marines also another example of perhaps going politicalization in the u.s. army -- in the u.s. military? >> i think it's very possible that it is. the military draws a lot of its people from the red states. a lot of people in the military tend to skew conservative politically at least initially when they enter the military. there's also a bit of a divide
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politically between the officer corps and the cadre which makes up 780%. that then puts them a bit more in a place where they're a bit more susceptible to these kinds of efforts of vaccine hesitancy and they're a bit more likely to be concerned about these things. everybody should be concerned an this, but the science is pretty clear that it is, in fact, these vaccines are, in fact, quite good and probably much more effective than many of the mandatory vaccines, the vaccines that are currently mandatory that the military uses at this point. >> always good to speak to you. thanks so much for joining us here on cnn. thank you. >> you bet, robyn.
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always a pleasure. >> as you heard it seems political party lines often play a role in who gets a shot and who does not. that's not the only issue. the hesitancy have health officials worried. here's more on that. >> i've always stayed healthy. i don't get sick. i try to take care of myself. >> officials in maine are trying to reach people like this 60-year-old truck driver who has been eligible for more than a month but has no intention of getting one. do you have any concerns about covid being out there and not being vaccinated? >> no, not really. >> edge comb is a supporter of former president donald trump. he is not alone in rejecting a covid vaccination. a recent poll from kaiser shows that fewer than half of republicans say they've gotten a vaccine or intend to do so as soon as possible. compared with about eight in ten democrats and almost six in ten
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independents. that vaccine hesitancy is happening despite many gop leaders, including former president trump, encouraging people to get vaccinated. >> everybody go get your shot. >> i'm not going. >> you're still not? >> i am the way i am. that's how it is. >> joy ask, a part time medical worker and hospitality worker says her mind is made up. she won't be rolling up her sleeve. >> i'm up and down with the government as it is, and i think that there's certain things that they put out. i don't think they even know. >> even though the vaccine has been safe and effective, she thinks it was rushed and is worried about possible lock-term side effects. >> i guess i have to watch and pray i don't get it. >> health officials are encouraged by a survey showing four you out of people plan to get the vaccine, one of the
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highest rates nationwide. at the same time, hesitancy could jen jazz their progress. the cdc warns it's not just politics keeping shots out of arm. >> there's a diversity of views. some folks have questions because they're skeptical of the government. other folks have questions because they are skeptical of vaccines in general. and i think the trick that we as a public health community have to do is meet those folks where they are. >> this county has one of the miest percentages of covid cases in the state. on this day, volunteers from a local health advocacy group are going door to door, urging lewiston residents to sign up. they're targeting members of the immigrant community but they will engage with anyone. >> did you get vaccinated? >> no. >> you don't want to? >> no. >> what did i tell you it's
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approved by the doctor. i got my shots, he got their shots. i think it's safe. >> i don't believe in it. >> conversations like this are not unusual. >> why the hesitancy, you think? >> boichl it's something to do with conspiracy theories. >> the state is planning more outrage for doctors to express concerns across the spectrum. >> they may not listen to me or someone in d.c. they may not listen to the pharmaceutical company, but they will listen to their doctor. >> still, for some, there may be little convincing. is there anyone who could influence you to get the vaccine? >> know. >> portland, maine. >> thanks to jason for that. coming up on cnn, we're seeing more deadly crackdowns in myanmar. we'll have the latest details just ahead. plus, a $10 promo reward. thanks for sharing! joi at panera,today and get yours.
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we've seen these very tense scenes in myanmar, as the military slaughters its own citizens at a brutal rate. more than 80 were killed on friday alone. this latest bloodshed happened an a hundred kilometers east of yangon. security forces used assault rifles, rocket from pelled grenades on people's homes. that brings the death toll since the cue to more than 700. paula, hi. images are devastating on top of this increasing death toll. >> and the monitoring group they're talk an, aapp, when they geoff these death toll updates, they say more than 80 died on friday, they still say that the real death toll is likely to be far higher. it's necessary to have a fair
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assessment of what's happening on the ground. a city 60 kilometers from yangon, we know that the shooting by the security forces started early in the morning and went throughout the day. this particularly eyewitness said that they had to hide in one of the neighboring villages. this is snag they know many people have done. they say that security forces are still searching neighborhood by neighborhood to try and find protesters, and they said that at one point, they heard that their bodies were piled up at the mortuary. now other local reports, which we cannot under peppily confirm, say that the military took many of those bodies, put them on the back of a military truck and drove them away. this is consistent with what we have been hearing many times from within the country from eyewitnesses as well. the military taking bodies away. now from their point of view, they give a very conflicting story of what happened on friday, saying that it was actually rioters that attacked the military, pointing out that
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they had hand-made guns, rocket bottles, shields, in fact only one protester died. so a very different account that from the military. hand made shields don't do a lot dependence a rocket propelled grenade. what we have heard from aapp, the ngo is they were trying to create a battle field when what they created was a killing field. also on friday at the same time this was happening, 1 people were sentenced to death by the military. the military saying that they had caused the deaths of two members of the hunta. clearly, the security forces can act with impunity. in this particularly occasion -- and we don't know the exact details of what happened -- the military saying that 19 people will be sentenced to death. and have been sentenced to death for killing two members of the
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junta. robyn. >> paula than cobs, thanks so much. coming up on cnn, ash from an actively erupting volcano covers this caribbean island. we'll give you the latest. that's next. hey google, turn up the heat. ♪ ♪ ♪ - [announcer] welcome to intelligent indoor grilling with the ninja foodi smart xl grill. just pick your protein, select your doneness, and let the grill monitor your food. it also turns into an air fryer. bring outdoor grilling flavors indoors with the grill that grills for you. ♪ ♪ we know it's going to take many forms of energy to meet the world's needs while creating a cleaner future for all.
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at chevron, we're lowering the carbon emissions intensity of our operations, investing in lower-carbon technologies, and exploring renewable fuels of the future. we work hard to care for the homes we love. but it's only human... to protect the one we share.
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spewing huge plumes of ash and smoke into the sky which have also reached neighboring islands especially barbados. authorities say the volcano could keep erupting for weeks. some 7,000 people were ordered to evacuate before the first eruption. let's go to derek van dam. derek is tracking this for us. what can you tell us? >> reporter: check out this video behind me because you're looking at a daytime video shot yesterday. this looks like the night, right? you can see how incredible this volcanic ash is. it's forcing some of the street lamps to be turned on, some of the houses turning on their lights because the ash is so thick it's actually blocking out the sun. looking at the latest go 16
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satellite from noaa and there's st. vincent. look at that bubbling almost smokestack-type feature. that is the volcano erupting. and just within the past three hours report on the ground talking about extensive power outages on the island because of the most recent explosive volcanic eruption, so it is continuing, ongoing and you can see just the ash that continues to spread to a northeasterly direction impacting the barbados region. that area is just completely covered in vannicolcanic ash at moment. the red and orange portions of have been evacuated. there's over 2,000 occupants taking advantage of those particular shelters. check this volcanic eruption diagram. you can see the ash that is falling from these explosive volcanic eruptions actually has
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the opportunity to create lightening. so what's happening is we get this volcanic ash that's positivity charged and get spewed into the upper levels of the atmosphere. we're talking 30, 35,000 feet into the sky, 10 kilometers per more. and these debrises our positivity charged. we get this displacement and this can create lightening within that ash cloud. so quite a dramatic sight and people on the ground there are witnessing something extraordinary if they're located in and around the island of st. vincent. just check out some of the neighboring locations. this is coming out of the ki kingstown. that is blanketing the roadways there with the volcanic ash. what a sight, people need to protect themselves from the volcanic ash there on the island. >> they certainly do. thanks for the update. derek van dam, thank you. wow, look at that.
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look at that. >> indeed. look at that. that is a waterspout just offshore panama city beach saturday and then coming onshore where it's considered a tornado. once on land it caused extensive damage in the area, knocked out power to hundreds of homes and businesses. that is certainly something to see. now scientists in florida are tracking wastewater that's dumping into tampa bay. they're concerned it could cause a toxic algae bloom and that's caused by red tide. the scientists at university of south florida's college of marine science say it's sending all its resources to address the problem as bill we arir now tel us. >> reporter: by pumping hundreds of millions of wastewater into tampa bay officials may have
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lowered the risk of a sudden man made flood but greatly increased the risk of another red tide. wow, you can really feel it in your nostrils and sinuses. it's like a mild pepper spray when this algae gets up into the air. so if we can feel that discomfort you've got to wonder what it's like to be a dolphin in water like this. in recent years they filled florida beaches with dead wildlife. the sight of more vultures than sea gulls was devastating to tourism and revealed the hidden cost of florida's multibillion dollar fertilizer industry. >> that is florida's biggest dirty secret. no one talks about it. you bring it up with our elected officials, they never acknowledge it as being a polluter. everyone will go into ag or big sugar. but no one ever talks about mosaic and the fossil fuel industry here and that is
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literally destroying our state. >> reporter: these are the man made wonders few people who come to florida ever get to see. it is a stadium sized pile of radioactive waste, material so radioactive epa won't allow it to be used in drywall or build roads. over mile of fertilizer creates 5 tons of this waste. this one is owned by mosaic the biggest phosphorus mining company in the nation. and when a 2016 sinkhole sent 200 million gallons of wastewater into the florida aquifer mosaic was forced to apologize for keeping the disaster quiet. >> i deeply regret and apologize for not providing that information sooner. >> it took two years and $84 million to fix that problem. but when the abandon piny point stacks first leaked a decade ago it's owner h.r.k. holdings filed
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for bankruptcy. >> it's very frustrating for 20 plus years in our state of florida deregulation and keeping our eyes off this ball has given us this problem today. >> our administration is dedicated to full enforcement of any damages to our state's resources and holding the company accountable for this event. it's not acceptable and not something we'll allow to persest. >> reporter: manatee county just approved a controversial plan to pump treated wastewater from piny point deep understoodground and worries about what it could do to the drinking water and the everglades could sue to stop it. so for now a cries averted is just a crisis delayed. bill weir, cnn, florida. >> stay with us. i'll be back with more cnn in just a moment. so you want to make the best burger ever? then make it!
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welcome to cnn newsroom. i'm robin curnow. thanks so much for ginning me this hour. coming up america emphasis new covid surge. where the virus is raging and how officials are trying to get it under control. plus honoring a prince. people around the world are remembering queen elizabeth husband, prince philip. we have new information about the royal funeral. plus -- >> you want democracy? we want democracy. >> cnn gets exclusive access inside myanmar. we'll show you what's really

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